optic_nerve_sheath_meningioma

Optic nerve sheath meningioma



Optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSM) are rare benign tumors of the optic nerve. 60–70% of cases occur in middle age females and are more common in older adults (mean age 44.7 years). It is also seen in children, but this is rare. The tumors grow from cells that surround the optic nerve, and as the tumor grows, it compresses the optic nerve. This causes loss of vision in the affected eye.

Rarely, it may affect both eyes at the same time.

It is typically a slow-growing tumor, and has never been reported to cause death. However, there is concern that the tumor can grow into the brain and cause other types of neurological damage. In some patients, the tumor grows so slowly that treatment is not necessary. Standard treatments are observation, surgery, radiation therapy, and combinations of the above.

Differential diagnoses include:

Adult optic neuritis

Optic nerve glioma

Orbital lymphoma

Orbital metastases

Sarcoidosis

Idiopathic orbital inflammatory disease (orbital pseudotumor)


Seropositive Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder Presenting With Optic Nerve Sheath Enhancement and Optic Disc Edema Resembling Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma 1)


1)
Marin AI, Zarubina AV, Bennett JL, Subramanian PS. Seropositive Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder Presenting With Optic Nerve Sheath Enhancement and Optic Disc Edema Resembling Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma. J Neuroophthalmol. 2023 May 29. doi: 10.1097/WNO.0000000000001894. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 37247229.
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